Philanthropy

Schedule

Week 1: Course introduction and concepts of philanthropy

  • Frumkin, P. (2015). The Idea of a Nonpro t and Voluntary Sector. In J. S. Ott & L. A. Dicke (Eds.), The Nature of the Nonpro t Sector (Third edition, pp. 11-21). Boulder, CO: Westview Press.
  • Payton, R. L., & Moody, M. P. (2008). Understanding Philanthropy: Its Meaning and Mission. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
  • Roeger, K. L., Blackwood, A. S., & Pettijohn, S. L. (2015). The Nonpro t Sector and Its Place in the National Economy. In J. S. Ott & L. A. Dicke (Eds.), The Nature of the Nonpro t Sector (Third edition, pp. 22-37). 00204. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.
  • Smith, D. H.  (1997).  The  Rest  of  the  Nonprofit  Sector:  Grassroots  Associations  as  the  Dark  Matter Ignored in Prevailing ”Flat Earth” Maps of the Sector.  Nonprofit  and  Voluntary Sector Quarterly, 26 (2), 114–131. doi:10.1177/0899764097262002.

Week 2: Colonial period and founding a new country (1600s-1850s)

  • Hall, P. D. (2006). A Historical Overview of Philanthropy, Voluntary Associations, and Nonprofit Organizations in the United States, 1600–2000. In W. W. Powell & R. Steinberg (Eds.), The nonprofit sector: A research handbook (pp. 32–65). Yale University Press.
  • Trattner, W. I. (1998). From Poor Law to Welfare State: A History of Social Welfare in America (6th Edition). New York: Free Press.
  • In-class activity: news article sharing and analysis. Bring a copy of a recent news article which can explain why philanthropy and nonprofit sector are important to this country.

Week 3: Civil War and scientific philanthropy (1850s-1920s)

  • Bremner, R. H. (1956). ” Scientific Philanthropy,” 1873-93. Social Service Review, 30 (2), 168–173. Retrieved September 10, 2016, from http://www.jstor.org/stable/30015895.
  • Carnegie, A. (1889). The Best Fields for Philanthropy. The North American Review, 149 (397), 682–698. Retrieved January 23, 2018, from http://www.jstor.org/stable/25101907.
  • Hall, P. D. (2006). A Historical Overview of Philanthropy, Voluntary Associations, and Nonprofit Organizations in the United States, 1600–2000. In W. W. Powell & R. Steinberg (Eds.), The nonprofit sector: A research handbook (pp. 32–65). Yale University Press.

In-class activity: case analysis. Find a nonprofit organization or project, explain why you think their works are “scientific.”

Week 4: Mass philanthropy

Before class

  • Hall, P. D. (2006). A Historical Overview of Philanthropy, Voluntary Associations, and Nonprofit Organizations in the United States, 1600–2000. In W. W. Powell & R. Steinberg (Eds.), The nonprofit sector: A research handbook (pp. 32–65). Yale University Press.
  • McCarthy, K. D. (2003). Women and  Political  Culture.  In  L.  J.  Friedman  &  M.  D.  McGarvie  (Eds.), Charity, philanthropy, and civility in American history. 00173. Cambridge, UK ; New York: Cambridge University Press.
  • O’Neill,  M.  (1994).   Introduction:   The  Paradox  of  Women   and  Power   in  the  Nonprofit  Sector.  In Women and Power in the Nonprofit Sector (1 edition). 00000. San Francisco, Calif: Jossey-Bass.
  • Zunz, O. (2012b). The Coming of Mass Philanthropy. In Philanthropy in America: A history (pp. 44–75). Politics and Society in Twentieth-Century America. 00222. Princeton, N.J: Princeton University Press.

In class

  • Lead discussion.
  • Group work on the first essay.

Week 5: Government–nonprofit relationship and cross-sector collaboration

Before class

  • Anheier, H. K. (2014b). State-nonprofit relations. In Nonprofit organizations: Theory, management, policy (Second Edition, pp. 429–454). Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge.
  • Salamon, L. M. (2012b). Government-nonprofit relations from an international perspective. In
  • J. S. Ott & L. A. Dicke (Eds.), The Nature of the Nonprofit Sector (2nd ed, pp. 367–384). Philadelphia, PA: Westview Press.
  • Young, D. R. (2006). Complementary, Supplementary, or Adversarial? Nonprofit-Government Relations. In E. T. Boris & C. E. Steuerle (Eds.), Nonprofits and Government: Collaboration and Conflict (2nd edition, pp. 37–79). Washington, D.C.: Urban Institute Press.

In class

  • Lead discussion.
  • Case analysis: “Inspirations Studio at Sistering: A Systems Analysis”.
  • Group work on the first essay.

Week 6: Nonprofit commercialization and mission drift

Before Class

  • Ebrahim, A., Battilana, J., & Mair, J. (2014). The governance of social enterprises:  Mission drift  and accountability challenges in hybrid organizations. Research in Organizational Behavior, 34 (Supplement C), 81–100. doi:10.1016/j.riob.2014.09.001.
  • Jones, M. B. (2007). The Multiple Sources of Mission Drift. Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, 36 (2), 299–307. doi:10.1177/0899764007300385.
  • Commercialization, Social Ventures, and For-Profit Competition. (2012a). In L. M. Salamon (Ed.), The State of Nonprofit America (2nd ed, pp. 521–548). Washington, D.C: Brookings Institution Press.
  • Foster, W. L., Kim, P., & Christiansen, B. (n.d.). Ten Nonprofit Funding  Models.  Stanford Social Innovation Review; Stanford, 7 (2), 32–39.

In class

Week 7: Social enterprise and social entrepreneurship

Before class

  • Bornstein, D. (2007). How to Change the World: Social Entrepreneurs and the Power of New Ideas, Updated Edition (Updated edition). Oxford; New York: Oxford University  Press.
  • Anheier, H. K. (2014a). Nonprofit organizations: Theory, management, policy (Second Edition). Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge.
  • Waddell, S. (2018). Four Strategies for Large Systems Change. Stanford Social Innovation Review, 16 (2), 40–45.
  • Ganz, M., Kay, T., & Spicer, J. (2018). Social Enterprise Is Not Social Change. Stanford Social Innovation Review, 16 (2), 59–60.

In class

  • Discussion on readings.
  • Discussion on video:
    • “I think this drive for profit is extremely powerful, sometimes more powerful than the most committed charity or government.” – What’s your opinion?
    • What are the strengths of government and private sector?
    • How she built the “win-win-win partnership”?

Week 8: Social innovation and social impact

Before class

  • Kania, J., & Kramer, M. (2011). Collective Impact. Stanford Social Innovation Review, 9 (1), 36–41.
  • Kevin, A., & Chris, F. (2018). Payment by Results and Social Impact Bonds: Outcome-based Payment Systems in the UK and US. Policy Press.
  • Briefly review “Group Convex: Measuring Its Impact” prepare for group discussion.

In class

  • Discussion on readings.
  • Case analysis: “Group Convex: Measuring Its Impact.”
    • What are the procedures for measuring “social impact”?
    • Select a stakeholder of your group’s interest, follow the procedures recommended, analyze the “social return on investment.”
    • How you can improve the calculation?
  • Presentation by Mission Capital.

Week 9: Reflection on philanthropy and nonprofit sector: why does the nonprofit sector exist?

Before class

  • Salamon, L. M., & Sokolowski, S. W. (2016).  Beyond  Nonprofits: Re-conceptualizing the Third Sector. VOLUNTAS: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, 27 (4), 1515–1545. doi:10.1007/s11266-016-9726-z.
  • Steinberg, R. (2006). Economic Theories of Nonprofit Organizations.  In  W.  W.  Powell  &  R.  Steinberg (Eds.), The nonprofit sector: A research handbook (pp. 117–139). Yale University Press.
  • Briefly review “Inspirations Studio at Sistering” prepare for group discussion.

In class


  • Discussion on readings.
  • Case analysis: “Inspirations Studio at Sistering.”
    • Who are the beneficiaries, and how are the values delivered?
    • How are the values created?
    • What resources and partners are needed?
  • Group discussion: “Moral decisions in nonprofit’s daily operations.”

Week 10: Value perspectives from ethics and philosophy

Before class

  • O’Neill, M. (2004). Ethics and Philanthropy. In D. F. Burlingame (Ed.), Philanthropy in America: A Comprehensive Historical Encyclopedia (pp. 140–143). Santa Barbara, Calif: ABC- CLIO.
  • Chapters from: Sandel, M. J. (2010). Justice: What’s the Right Thing to Do?  (Reprint  edition).  New  York:  Farrar, Straus and Giroux.
  • Briefly review “Cutting Calories or Cutting Costs?” prepare for group discussion.

In class

  • Discussion on readings.

  • Moral Machine
  • Case analysis: “Cutting Calories or Cutting Costs?”

Week 11: Ethical issues in practice

Before class

  • Chapters from: Sandel, M. J. (2010). Justice: What’s the Right Thing to Do?  (Reprint  edition).  New  York:  Farrar, Straus and Giroux.
  • Singer,  P.  (2011).   What Should a Billionaire  Give—and  What  Should  You?   In P.  Illingworth, T.  Pogge,  &  L.  Wenar  (Eds.),  Giving Well:  The Ethics of Philanthropy. Oxford University Press.
  • Briefly review “Should a nonprofit take a donor’s money if it was made through questionable means?” prepare for group discussion.
  • Further readings (not required):
    • Stiltner, B. (2016). Toward Thriving Communities: Virtue Ethics as Social Ethics. Anselm Academic.

In class



  • Discussion on readings.
  • Case analysis: “Should a nonprofit take a donor’s money if it was made through questionable means?”
  • Work on Essay 2: Ethics case analysis: What is the right thing to do (15%, due: 11/19)

Week 12: Civilizations and world religions

  • Huntington, S. P. (1993). The Clash of Civilizations? Foreign Affairs, 72 (3), 22–49. doi:10.2307/20045621.
  • Kymlicka, W. (1995). Multicultural Citizenship: A Liberal Theory of Minority Rights. Oxford Political Theory. 12568. Oxford: Clarendon.
  • Volf, M. (2016). Flourishing: Why We Need Religion in a Globalized World. Yale University Press.

In class


  • Discussion on readings.
  • Work on Essay 2: Ethics case analysis: What is the right thing to do (15%, due: 11/19)

Week 13: Philanthropy and global civil society

  • Moran, M., & Stone, D. (2016). The New Philanthropy: Private Power in International Development Policy? In J. Grugel & D. Hammett (Eds.), The Palgrave Handbook of International Development (pp. 297–313). doi:10.1057/978-1-137-42724-3 17.
  • Sievers, B. R. (2010). Civil Society, Philanthropy, and the Fate of the Commons. Tufts University Press.
  • Vogel, A. (2006). Who’s making global civil society: Philanthropy and US empire in world society. The British Journal of Sociology, 57 (4), 635–655. doi:10 . 1111 /j. 1468 – 4446 . 2006 . 00129.x.
  • Zunz, O. (2012a). Philanthropy in America: A history. Politics and Society in Twentieth-Century America. 00214. Princeton, N.J: Princeton University Press.

Week 14: US-China relationship from the perspective of civil society and philanthropy

  • Bp Yu Yue Tsu. (1912). The Spirit of Chinese Philanthropy: A Study in Mutual Aid. AFL. Columbia University.
  • Fung, Y.-l. (1997). A Short History of Chinese Philosophy (Reissue edition) (D. Bodde, Ed.). New York: Free Press.
  • Spires, A. J. (2011). Organizational Homophily in International  Grantmaking:  US-Based  Foundations and their Grantees in China. Journal of Civil Society, 7 (3), 305–331. doi:10.1080/17448689.2011.605005.
  • Tsai, L. L. (2007). Solidary groups, informal accountability, and local public goods provision in rural China. American Political Science Review, 101 (02), 355–372.